Technology

What is Aura Air’s purification technology?

Aura Air uses 4 unique stages of air purification and disinfection:

  1. The Pre-filter removes big particles of airborne dust.
  2. Using the UVC we reduce the bacteria and virus concertation in the air.
  3. The Ray-filter™ purifies the air from PM 10, PM 2.5, germs, tobacco scent, bacteria, viruses, fungus,  and flu germs.

The Ray filter consists of three parts:

  • – Copper: A smart fabric cover with a copper layer that filters viruses, bacteria, and more.
  • – Carbon layer: Absorbs VOCs and bad odors.
  • – HEPA filter- 99.98% effective particle filter of 0.3 microns.

Our patent Sterionizer completes the purification and disinfection stage by sending positive and negative ions into the air. These charged oxygen molecules O2+ and O2- have high chemical activity and when reacting with water molecules in the air, OH radicals and H2O2 (Hydrogen Peroxide) are formed. A chemical reaction occurs and oxidants break down the protein structure of pollutants, rendering them harmless.Aura_Air_Technology_Chart__1_.png

How does the Aura Air device alleviate allergies?

Our Ray-filter™ has a special layer, impregnated with copper, that neutralizes dust mites. The Pre-filter targets pollen as it filters both PM 10 and 2.5 fine particles. Furthermore, once assigned by the user, the device will provide you information regarding your specific allergies.

Aura Covid-19 Sheba Medical Hospital Pilot Results

For more information, open the attached
Coronavirus Pilot at Sheba Medical Center White Paper.Screen_Shot_2020-10-13_at_16.17.13.png

Air Quality and Sensor Measurements

What is AQI?

Aura Air’s Air Quality Index (AQI) was developed based on academic research, national AQIs, and other important considerations.

The AQI scale goes from 0 = ‘Excellent’ to 500 = ‘Hazardous’ with 6 color-coded categories of equal lengths, as you can see here:

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What sensors does the device measure?

Indoor AQI

CO

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a poisonous gas that is produced from burning fuels such as wood, oil, natural gas, kerosene, coal, and gasoline. Because CO is invisible, odorless, tasteless, and non-irritating, the gas can cause harm before you are aware of its presence. CO is measured in PPM (parts per million).

Amount of PPMRisk Level
0.5 – 5low; average levels in homes without gas stoves
5 – 15average; properly adjusted stoves
30+high; poor management of stoves

CO2

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the gas that people and plants exhale while breathing. Different levels of CO2 in the air can mean different things and cause different side effects based on each level. Levels are measured in PPM (parts per million).

Amount of PPMRisk LevelEffects on Environment
250 – 350Excellentnormal outdoor levels
350 – 1,000Goodtypical level found in occupied spaces
1,000 – 2,000Moderateassociated with complaints of drowsiness and nausea
2,000 – 5,000Lowstagnant, stale, and stuffy air; poot concentration
5,000Poorunusual levels; other gases could be present; toxicity or oxygen deprivation can occur
40,000Hazardousimmediate harm due to oxygen deprivation

VOCs

Total Volatile Organic Compounds are a large group of chemicals that can be found in many products we use to build and maintain our homes. Once these chemicals are in our homes, they are released or “off-gassed” into the indoor air we breathe. VOC levels are measured in ppb (parts per billion).

Amount of PPBRisk Level
0 – 250Excellent
250 – 2,000Moderate
2,000+Unhealthy

PM 10

Particles in the PM10 size range are commonly present in the air and could be drawn into the body with every breath. In our lungs, particles can have a direct physical effect and/or be absorbed into the blood. Technically, there is no safe level of PM10, as any amount of particulate matter in your air isn’t a good thing. The recommended normal level of PM10 should be 100 micrograms per cubic meter.

Amount Per Cubic MeterRisk LevelEffects on Environment
0 – 55Good (0-50)no impacts
56 – 155Moderate (51-100)individuals sensitive to NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) should consider limiting prolonged outdoor exertion
156 – 255Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (101-150)increased likelihood of respiratory symptoms for sensitive groups; children, elderly, and medically affected should limit lengthened outdoor exertion
256 – 355Unhealthy (151-200)significant increase of respiratory symptoms for sensitive groups; children, elderly, and medically affected should avoid any lengthened outdoor exertion; general public should limit prolonged outdoor exertion
356 – 425Very Unhealthy (201-300)serious increase of respiratory symptoms for sensitive groups; children, elderly, and medically affected should avoid all outdoor exertion; general public should limit prolonged outdoor exertion
426+Hazardous (301-500)everyone should avoid any outdoor exertion; children, elderly, and medically affected should remain indoors.

PM 2.5

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is an air pollutant that is a concern for people’s health when levels in the air are high. PM2.5 are tiny particles in the air that reduce visibility and cause the air to appear hazy when levels are elevated. PM2.5 is measured every 24 hours in micrograms per cubic meter. A normal level of PM2.5 should be 60 micrograms per cubic meter.

Amount Per Cubic MeterRisk LevelEffects on Environment
0 – 12.0Good (0-50)no impacts
12.1 – 35.4Moderate (51-100)individuals sensitive to NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) should consider limiting prolonged outdoor exertion
35.5 – 55.4Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (101-150)increased likelihood of respiratory symptoms for sensitive groups; children, elderly, and medically affected should limit lengthened outdoor exertion
55.5 -150.4Unhealthy (151-200)significant increase of respiratory symptoms for sensitive groups; children, elderly, and medically affected should avoid any lengthened outdoor exertion; general public should limit prolonged outdoor exertion
150.5 – 250.4Very Unhealthy (201-300)serious increase of respiratory symptoms for sensitive groups; children, elderly, and medically affected should avoid all outdoor exertion; general public should limit prolonged outdoor exertion
250.5 – 500.4Hazardous (301-500)everyone should avoid any outdoor exertion;  children, elderly, and medically affected should remain indoors.

Outdoor AQI

The outdoor AQI (Air Quality Index) presented is based on EPA’s national air quality standards.

The AQI scale goes from 0 = ‘Excellent’ to 500 = ‘Hazardous’ with 6 color-coded categories of equal lengths. AQI’s often vary between countries.

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NO2

Nitrogen oxides are a group of seven gases and compounds composed of nitrogen and oxygen.  They are emitted from vehicle exhausts; the burning of coal, oil, diesel fuel, natural gas, and especially from electric power plants. They are also emitted by cigarettes, gas stoves, home heating appliances, and wood-burning ovens. The EPA (the United States Environmental Protection Agency), has set up a 1-hour NO2 standard at the level of 100 parts per billion (ppb). The annual average of standard NO2 is 53 ppb.

Risk LevelEffects on Environment
Good (0-50)no health impacts
Moderate (51-100)individuals sensitive to NO2 should consider limiting prolonged outdoor exertion
Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (101-150)children, elderly, and medically affected should limit prolonged outdoor exertion
Unhealthy (151-200)children, elderly, and medically affected should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion; general public should limit lengthened outdoor exertion
Very Unhealthy (201-300)children, elderly, and medically affected should avoid all outdoor exertion; general public should limit outdoor exertion

O3

The ozone is a gas that occurs both in the earth’s upper atmosphere and at the earth’s ground level. In the upper atmosphere, the ozone protects life on earth from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. The ozone on the ground level is the main ingredient of smog. It is formed when sunlight reacts with pollution from vehicles, power plants, and industrial sources. Ozone pollution is the worst in the afternoon and early evening. The ozone standard is set at a level of 0.075 ppm averaged over an 8-hour period. This standard is met at an air quality monitor when the 3-year average of the annual fourth-highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration is less than or equal to 0.070 ppm.

Risk LevelEffects on Environment
Good (0-50)no impacts
Moderate (51-100)individuals sensitive to ozone should consider limiting prolonged outdoor exertion
Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (101-150)children, elderly, medically affected, and outdoor enthusiasts should reduce prolonged outdoor exertion; asthma infected individuals should follow their medication instructions
Unhealthy (151-200)children, elderly, medically affected, and outdoor enthusiasts should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion; asthma infected individuals should keep extra medications; general public should reduce lengthened outdoor exertion
Very Unhealthy (201-300)children, elderly, medically affected, and outdoor enthusiasts should avoid all outdoor activities; asthma infected individuals should keep extra medications; general public should avoid lengthened outdoor exertion
Hazardous (301-500)all groups should avoid any outdoor activities

SO2

Sulfur dioxide is an invisible gas that has an unpleasant, sharp smell. It reacts easily with other substances to form harmful compounds, such as sulfuric acid, sulfurous acid, and sulfate particles. An AQI of 100 for sulfur dioxide corresponds to a level of 75 parts per billion (averaged over one hour). Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) is generally recognized between 0.3-1.4 ppm and is easily noticeable at 3 ppm. It can be detected by taste at concentrations of 0.35-1.05 ppm and has a strong and irritating smell. The odor threshold is between 0.67-4.75 ppm.

Risk LevelEffects on Environment
Good (0-50)no impacts
Moderate (51-100)no impacts
Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (101-150)children, elderly, medically affected, and outdoor enthusiasts should reduce prolonged outdoor exertion; asthma infected individuals should follow their medication instructions
Unhealthy (151-200)children, elderly, medically affected, and outdoor enthusiasts should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion; asthma infected individuals should keep extra medications; general public should reduce lengthened outdoor exertion
Very Unhealthy (201-300)children, elderly, medically affected, and outdoor enthusiasts should avoid all outdoor activities; asthma infected individuals should keep extra medications; general public should avoid lengthened outdoor exertion
Hazardous (301-500)all groups should avoid any outdoor activities